Sunday, February 17, 2008

Photography Lesson





















Have you been to Izmir? You must go.

Izmir Daily Photo is one of my favorite photo blogs. Monoblog posts a work of art every day. I've given him so many compliments that he's seen fit to stop by here from time to time. When he saw my February 12th post, he sent this very kind email:

"I really like the photo of palm trees in your latest blog. But I can't help myself to give you a piece of advice. Sometimes cropping a photo is the simplest way to improve the composition of your photograph. So, the viewer will focus on the main image. I've cropped your image and I think cropped image has a different feel and focus. All the best...Monoblog."

"Well, of all the nerve," you might think, if you'd never seen Monoblog's photos. But my first thought was, "He likes my photo!"

Monoblog's crop shows a subtle difference, but a clear one. By cropping the excess sky and clouds and some unnecessary pieces of building, he allows the palm trees to take center stage. They are, after all, the subject of the photo.

In a further example of Monoblog's teaching, see how his simple crop brings the subject of my February 13th post more directly to your attention.


















Now, if you haven't done so already, go look at Izmir Daily Photo. One look and you'll know why I'm so pleased to accept all the tips I can get from such a fine photographer as Monoblog.

9 comments:

Kim said...

I visit Izmir as often as possible and agree with you whole heartedly. In the suggested crops he sent you I notice he is paying attention to the rule of thirds and placing your main elements in the sweet spots, making very pleasing arrangements. It's so nice that he would pass on great tips like that. Have fun trying his suggestions. And, I love your palm trees with blue sky which remind me of my childhood in So.Cal.

marley said...

What a great piece of practical advise he has given you. I have only recently started to crop some of my snaps and find it really interesting how sometimes it can change the content of the photo quite dramatically.

Petrea said...

Yes, Kim, my husband has knowledge of the camera (film) and has told me about the grid--my Olympus SP350 even has a little grid you can use, but I've been trying to do without it. I don't like having all that stuff on the viewfinder. But I was trying to do it in the shooting, and hadn't really thought of doing the work in the cropping.

Marley, you're so right. Even the tiniest cut can make a huge difference in one's perception.

I'm (obviously) not a trained photographer. However, the creativity involved is wildly fun for me and I'm having a blast riding this new learning curve.

Bernie K. said...

Trained photographers are cute—they can sit up, fetch, rewind (or download)—but I prefer the undomesticated variety. They have the excitement of discovering something for the first time & often their images are vivid.

Rose said...

Did you add some blue to the sky on the second picture?

Petrea said...

Hi Rose, the second picture is Monoblog's fix. I didn't ask him if he did any color enhancing, but it looks like he might have. If you've looked at his blog (Izmir Daily Photo), you'll see he dabbles in PhotoShop or something like it.

There are different schools of thought on this. I say it's art, show me what you've got!

monoblog said...

Petrea, it's a great feeling to be featured in your daily blog. It was generous of you to give me so much credit! This means a lot to me. Thank you for your kindness...

About Rose's question, I've done slight post processing in Photoshop.

Jilly said...

Funnily enough I discovered Izmir's blog yesterday and love his photography. Very interesting to read your comments and see the different ways of cropping a photo. I too have had help from Chuckeroon on Richmond Daily Photo. How lucky we are to have help, aren't we? And it's so exciting to learn, don't you think.

Petrea said...

Monoblog, the pleasure's all mine.

Jilly: yes, it's good to have help. You have such a beautiful place to photograph, I hardly notice. But it's exciting not only to show people where we live, but to be creative about it.