Friday, December 7, 2012

Oak Knoll Kinderhaus

You'd think, as many times as I've driven, walked, floated and flown past this imaginatively-painted building I'd have taken note of what goes on there.

Some things you don't get to right away. You get to them eventually. I'm sure I'm not alone in this.

I have finally taken a picture of the Oak Knoll Kinderhaus, and looked it up online. It's a Montessori school on Lake Avenue in Pasadena.

That doesn't mean I know anything. I didn't go to a Montessori school and don't know much about it. Wikipedia has a description.

Do you have experience with Montessori?

I'm going to put up the holiday lights. I'm not saying when, but I'll get to it.


14 comments:

llandudnopictures said...

Whatever 'it' is, it looks very warming with the sunlight splashing onto it. Good luck with the lights!

Kalei's Best Friend said...

When I lived in the SF Valley there was a Montessori school... Back then it was a school for the chi chi families... A step above Pinecrest Schools... I have no idea if their way of teaching was better, then again a friend who worked at Buckley, another private school had parents who were over the top... they knew how to talk their way in as well as get special treatment for their darling children.... From my experience w/private pre-schools, its all who you know and schmooze up to.. Money talks...

Bellis said...

Glad you managed to capture this beautifully painted building - a stand-out on that part of Lake. But what had you been drinking when you floated past?

KBF's got it. We tried to get our young kids into the Montessori school in Baltimore because we were horrified by the state of the public school. (Coming from England, the signs saying No Guns were a bit of a shock.) Of course, the Montessori was fully booked years in advance.

Petrea Burchard said...

So it's about money? To tell you the truth, I had always thought it was more of a hippie thing, a sort of "free thinking" way to teach and learn. Shows you how much I know.

altadenahiker said...

Montessori now owns that beautifully situated school at the top of Loma Alta, with views all the way to the ocean. Guess they have a very successful biz model.

Bellis said...

Which school is that? The Rosebud Academy?

Petrea Burchard said...

That's what shows on Google maps, Bellis.

Adele said...

I thought what PB thought. So... Free-thinking, hippie/yuppies, who admire a good business model, and have a ton of cash to spend?

Ms M said...

Very attractive colors and design, especially with in the sunlight glow.

There are a few Montessori schools here. But I don't know enough about them to weigh in.

Petrea Burchard said...

Adele, that sounds like a 1980's fantasy I had of my future.

Ms. M., apparently they're successful. There are many thousands in the US, according to the website.

Katie said...

I like all various shades of green here, and the orange goes well. I have no clue about what Montessori schools are all about either, but that obviously have a good sense of color at this school.

Pasadena Adjacent said...

This place gets my attention every time I pass it. Wonders in cinderblock always will

Petrea Burchard said...

Compliments for this building from you, Katie, and from you, PA, reinforce my sense of it. I know you two have good artistic taste.

Latino Heritage said...

Okay, get comfy, here comes a bit of history. In one of my former chunks of life I taught preschool

Maria Montessori was an educator and physician. Used her education and her experiences and set up what eventually is referred to as the Montessori School.

There are a series of tasks that students do and the children set their own pace. Children will often help others once they have completed a task. Big focus on the kinesthetic aspects of learning.

The teacher is involved but in a different sort of role. He or she functions more like a coordinator than a lecturer. There is a specific training to do the most formal Montessori programs, but a good deal of Early Childhood Development training incorporates aspects of the method.

Recognition or her work and adoption of the Montessori method began to really gain popularity in the early 20th century in Italy.

The building and school on Lake was established by a mother, daughter team. It was in the 90s, I believe.

An interesting thing about your floating by and color. They have rarely had to deal with graffiti and felt that the color contributed to not having graffiti on the walls.

Oh, Rosebud Academy is not a Montessori School. It's a PUSD Charter school.