Wednesday, August 22, 2012

PMH Super Twofer

Two new exhibits at the Pasadena Museum of History are well worth your visit.

You're going to love the enthralling Pacific Electric Railway, Then and Now, an exhibit of memorabilia and "then and now" photos based on the book by Steve Crise and Michael Patris. Crise took the exquisite "now" pictures with more than expertise: he added care and wit. Not satisfied to simply position his camera to correspond exactly with the "then" photos, Crise went to the trouble to take his photographs at the same time of day so shadows would correspond. He added witty touches as well, even waiting for the time on a clock to be the same in one photo as it was back then.

Oh and note the detail of the train crossing gate above. A delicious touch.

Tasty in a whole different way (like a banana split with a whiskey chaser) is What a Long, Strange Trip it's Been: 35 Years of the Pasadena Doo Dah Parade. Just across the hall from the trains you'll find photos, costumes, signs, and uh, stuff, collected from past Doo Dah Parades. I wish my photo of the crowns of past Doo Dah queens had worked! That is some fab headgear.

Doo Dah is our own mini-Burning Man, Pasadena's hand-made, knee-jerk reaction to the Tournament of Roses. There may be other events like it, but they probably haven't had a lot of museum coverage. Bravo to the PMH for proclaiming Doo Dah as part of Pasadena's history, which of course it is. My only concern is the exhibit may legitimize Doo Dah, and I would hate for that to happen.

16 comments:

Paul @ Leeds Daily Photo said...

Now and then is always an interesting theme, especially on a specific topic.

Artem Tarasov said...

When I saw photo from first exhibition I immediately remember one book what I have. It show same signs (including road sighs) from the different places of the Earth. It's very interesting. We get used to our road signs, but when you see the same sign in 50 different variations, you realize that what they still are different.

Petrea Burchard said...

I agree, Paul, and when it's done this well it's especially fun.

That sounds fascinating, Artem. I guess every society needs to say the same things, even if we have our different ways of doing so.

Adele said...

This looks great. Especially the "then and now" aspect. I could look at that sort if thing for days.

Adele said...

Bah! Typo... "of thing"!

dive said...

Two great exhibitions. I'd really like to come over and spend some time looking at both.
Excellent link from yesterday's post with Snotty Scotty, too.

Petrea Burchard said...

Adele, I love "then and now" too, especially when I'm familiar with the "now."

Dive, I thought the Snotty Scotty references would please you. They are local favorites; they play at the Colorado Street Bridge party and of course in the Doo Dah Parade.

LOLfromPasa said...

I clicked on the link, Petrea, and did my eyes light up. The top photo shows my church (Pasadena Presbyterian) original building which had to be pulled down after an earthquake in the early 80's, I think. Great to see church with the railway. I noticed the Star News and The Broadway buildings too. Thank you so much! PS. I have never been to the Museum - next trip!!

Margaret said...

It is a fun place. Do they still have the hat exhibit? That was my favorite.

Susan Campisi said...

I've never been to the Pasadena Museum of History. I really need to make like a tourist in this town and visit all these gems you point out. Have I said that already? Both these exhibits look great. I have until January to go see them. I'm going to do it!

Ms M said...

Both of those exhibits look fascinating. If I lived nearby, I'd go.

Petrea Burchard said...

LOL, that is so cool!

Margaret, the Doo Dah Exhibit is in the room where the hats were. I loved the hats, too.

Do it, Susan. And you might want to save a second visit for later this fall after the Fenyes Mansion reopens. It's part of the museum, too, and deserves its own visit.

It would be fun to show you around here, Ms. M.

Patrizzi Intergarlictica said...

It's so cute that the Pasadena Museum of History on Facebook gave you a shout out, Petrea!

Pasadena Museum of History shared a link.
10 hours ago
Check out Pasadena Daily Photo's "Super Twofer" post on our new exhibits-- http://pasadenadailyphoto.blogspot.com/2012/08/pmh-super-twofer.html.

While you're at it, make plans to come by and see the displays in person! And visit the PDP blogspot often for great photos and commentary on all aspects of Pasadena and environs by the very, very talented Petrea Burchard.
Pasadena Daily Photo: PMH Super Twofer
pasadenadailyphoto.blogspot.com

Petrea Burchard said...

Patrizzi, your majesty! Thank you for letting me know, I might not have seen that otherwise because I didn't get "atted." That's very, very nice.

Bellis said...

I can only comment now because internet access was difficult in Jackson Hole. Everyone staying at the Lodge was trying to get online at the same time and there wasn't enough bandwidth to cope. Perhaps that kind of problem will soon be history too. Maybe there will even be an exhibition about it.

I knew you'd like the "before and after" railway photos. They're SO WELL DONE! Now I have to look for some of the old RR crossings that are still slightly visible in the Oak Knoll area, taking a photo of the photo along with me. We used to have a red car route along California Boulevard right past our house. Old-timers tell me it went from West Pasadena to Glendora, but I can't find it on a route map. The trains must have been very noisy, because one famous craftsman bungalow up the road was built back to front to shelter the main rooms from the train noise. I know we're all sad now that the trains don't run any more, but I remember when trams were removed from my home town in the 1960s, and everyone was relieved that the noise and visual pollution from the tram lines and overhead electrical wires was gone. Now they've reintroduced them!

Petrea Burchard said...

Bellis, a story about the train that ran along California Blvd.: One went renegade and barreled down the hill into the Arroyo. No one was hurt. I wish I could remember where I read that. This may have been around the time of Busch Gardens. Either that or I'm conflating those stories.