Monday, June 25, 2012

Zen Monday: #202


Today is Zen Monday. This very day. We're getting good at it.

I know this one looks easy, but let's put our minds to it. What is the Zen of today's photo?

18 comments:

Shell Sherree said...

I'm sorry, I just ran away screaming...

Kalei's Best Friend said...

The box top looks like it went threw the mill for sure!.
( I think every English teacher is shaking their head!) lol

BaysideLife said...

I'm threw with this box, but we should save it anyway.

Gotta love the English language.

LONDONLULU said...

Well, having just helped a newly-unpacked friend with her housewarming party, the sight of another unpacked box gives me heebie-jeebies (never mind the language butchering! :)

Anonymous said...

It sounds vaguely Shakespearean, as in "do not away via this box".

I know, I know. Coffee.

Happy Monday,
Betsy

Pasadena Adjacent said...

Hoarder and bad speller - hmmm - must be related to me

altadenahiker said...

Beets me.

Clifford Beshers said...

Think outside the box, not through the box.

Bellis said...

They think through is pronounced like dough? Oh no.

Bellis said...

Betsy's onto something. Maybe they're channeling Dylan Thomas's ode to his dying father: "Do not go gentle through that box away."

TheChieftess said...

Clifford got the one I wish I'd thought of !!!

Deb said...

Spell checkers, ya gotta love 'em.

Anonymous said...

That darned auto-correct strikes again

Petrea Burchard said...

Sew few comments today. Maybe were dun.

Ms M said...

The commints wer so gud they made me laf out lowd.

Petrea Burchard said...

Eye guess wee our threw. Thank you awl four playing two day. Its bin fun.

Trish said...

Weere knot threw, Eyem knot dun commentting.

Reemindes mee uf thee knote a freind poosted fer himselfs un daye. "Reemember doughnughts".

Nooo, thee freind wuz knot dyslexick.

Eye theenk thut txting ees killink spellink een thees countreee.

Petrea Burchard said...

Accepted spelling changes over time. Check out Shakespeare's First Folio for an example. He invented many of the words we use today, and spelled some of them quite differently than we do now.