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Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Burnt

Growing up in Illinois there were days when it was so cold you couldn't go outside, or if you did, you bundled up in extra socks and waterproof boots. You added layers under your hooded parka, a scarf around your face to protect your nose and eyes. Then came mittens--not gloves--because you needed your fingers to generate heat and keep each other warm.

In the southwest we have days when you shouldn't go outside, but they're at the opposite end of the thermometer. You don't bundle up for such weather but if you must be out for a while you do cover up: you need a brim on that hat, plus sunglasses to protect your vision, long sleeves and preferably long pants to preserve your skin, and sunscreen on the remaining exposed dermal inches.

Our temps came back into the 90s yesterday, down from over 100 degrees, and it felt like relief. It got so hot this time I could go outdoors without a sweater even at night. (Now that I love.) We'll be back to the high 80s by Wednesday--in other words, back to normal.

This camellia will survive. But it's a good argument for sunscreen.

26 comments:

Eleonora said...

My dad is from Chicago, and he too lives in the warmth of California. I guess the cold traumatizes!

Here in Rome the leaves should still be green and lush, but thanks to a horrible heat wave, streets look like fall, with crunchy brown leaves blanketing the pavement...

Poor magnolia!

dive said...

You make me almost glad to be in England, Petrea.

Book Dragon said...

lovely picture Petra. I wanted to touch the screen to see if the burnt edge was curled.

altadenahiker said...

Thankfully, it didn't last long. But you should see my tomatoes. Or not.

Michael Coppess said...

Cooler today but more triple digits coming next week.

Petrea Burchard said...

I came here from Chicago, too, Eleonora. I think I understand your father's reasoning. Rome in autumn! A little early.

Dive, we must find happiness with what we have or we will always be longing. Glad I could help.

Oh, interesting, Book Dragon. I see what you mean. It's nut curled. It looks like it just singed off.

I'm sorry about your tomatoes, Hiker. I've been watering my mystery pumpkin/squash thing every day but it still has only one fruit on it, and I think its growth has been stunted.

Okay, Michael. This time I'm ready, sort of.

Bellis said...

I remember a heat wave in England (long, long ago in the 80s) when we were advised to put sunscreen on our pond fish.

How did the camellia get burnt like that? Was someone looking at it with a magnifying glass? Or is it growing in front of the Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall in LA, which I drove past on a very hot day last week and was almost lasered by the heat coming off the shiny concave metal "wings".

Petrea Burchard said...

I guess it's just its placement, Bellis. Several leaves on the west side of the tree are singed.

Trish said...

late afternoon singe is what I call it Petrea! Bad enough to keep the plants warm in the morning as well as overnight. By the afternoon, they are already too hot, then you scorch them with searing hot sun and well, you know, I'd look pretty burnt by then too! If you can put a tarp up over them (like the EZ UP concept---nothing touching the plants), air can flow and direct sun won't hit them. They'll still be too hot and need water, but the singe will be less.

Not all of CA is roasting, NorCal is only in the 70's today, tho I hear high 90's are on their way back. The thing I point out to folks is that here in CA, I don't shovel snow unless I travel TO it, which, while I HATE the heat (I don't use the word hate unless I mean it), I really hate shoveling more!

Speedway said...

When I hung out the planter for my tomatoes, I hung it under the balcony rather than full sun. Some years back, tomatoes we planted in the sun just got baked on the vine, otherwise I'd have followed the directions for "full sun." The vine is fat and bushy now, with blossoms, so with luck I expect to have some tomatoes by the end of September. Late better than burnt.

Poor camellia, I know just how it feels. I cover myself with cotton shirts and shorts, a baseball hat and use 50 SPF sunscreen as necessary. I still end up with little spots of cancer from time to time. Ewww. Kill it, kill it, kill it.

Years ago, a photographer friend died from the melanoma that invaded his body. In the 50s and 60s, he'd been a red-haired, fair-skinned surfin' crazy beachboy in Venice, CA and paid the price for it in the 80s. Be careful out there, everybody.

Anonymous said...

ginab:

Wellll, dear ones, today is day 66 of 100-degree temperatures this year. I'm just sayin'.

Petrea Burchard said...

Good advice, Trish.

You be careful too, speedway!

Ginab, we really can't complain here. The rest of the country has had an awful, oppressive summer and we've only had a few days of it.

Bellis said...

And England's had the worst summer for 18 years!

Karen said...

A relative gave me one of those shiny tropical plants last holiday season. It just moldered indoors looking miserable so I put it on the patio to die because I figured it would never survive outside.

Lo and behold, it had a great time out there! Took off, put out new leaves and even had a red flower emerging.

Until this week. I went out and the poor thing is just burned to a crisp. :-( I moved it into complete shade but I don't know if it's going to live. It's a survivor, but ...

What kind of fruit did your mystery plant put out?

Laurie said...

Poor little leaf!

Steven said...

Having spent a good deal of time in Iowa, Nebraska, and Missouri I know all about heat and humidity in the Summer. And a tad bit of cold in the Winter. Fifty some years without A/C toughens you up too.

TheChieftess said...

Dare I say it? It's been in the 80's here!!! But...we do have to shovel snow in a few months!!!

We were down in Glendale the weekend of the 20th to celebrate with TheChief's daughter as she wed her beau ...the heat thankfully broke enough that we only sweltered moderately...and the wedding went on without a hitch!!!

BTW Petrea, I referenced your blog today in MammothLakesDP!!!

Desiree said...

Oh my!

Ms M said...

Poor leaf. The sun has been baking plants here, too, lately. Even when they are watered daily and in partial shade. But it's supposed to be cooler by the weekend. We'll see....

WV: dedness: The phenomenon that occurs when plants are burnt by the scorching sun.

Petrea Burchard said...

Dedness is right.

Chieftess, thanks! I'll stop by as soon as I get tomorrow's post up: Guest Author Linda Dove! Very excited over here.

Karen, I think it's some kind of pumpkin but it stopped growing when the heat started, even with lots of water. It's stunted. And there have been no more fruits on the vine, although the vine seems to be doing okay. I gave it a trellis because it was taking over the yard and it needed somewhere else to go!

Susan Campisi said...

I've noticed burnt leaves on some of my plants, too. I was in Oakland today where it was about 70degrees. It felt downright chilly.

Petrea Burchard said...

That's where the parka comes in handy, Susan.

Virginia said...

Please Lord, don't let the temps hit 100 when I get out there!!!! I've paid my dues here this summer. I"m needing some relief.

And P., you wear a sweater anytime in the summer? Have mercy!
V

Karen said...

That's weird, P. Usually that type of plant loves the heat.

TheChieftess said...

If it's too hot in SoCal Virginia...you can always come to Mammoth!!!

Petrea Burchard said...

Maybe it's placement, Karen. Several of the leaves were burned after the few days of heat and nobody's been back there but us.