Tuesday, January 13, 2009

First Cut Contest: How's It Going?

At the top of the steps, a supporting post of the arcade bore four plaques commemorating officers killed in the line of duty since the city's incorporation in 1886...Vining reflected that she had nearly become the fifth name...

Okay, you know we're doing a contest, right? Read The First Cut by best-selling Pasadena author Dianne Emley, answer questions about it and win a copy of the sequel, Cut to the Quick. (The rules are here. The questions are here.)

In the story, Pasadena Police Detective Nan Vining is wrestling with her own demons while trying to track down the real-life demon who murdered LAPD officer Frankie Lynde and dumped her body under the Colorado Street Bridge.

Until Mademoiselle Gramophone pointed it out to me, I hadn't realized you could get The First Cut at the library. But of course! And Pasadena's library has several branches. So if you like a heart-pounding read, check it out. Literally. Of course you can also get The First Cut at any book store. The contest deadline isn't until January 27th so there's plenty of time.

You're allowed to ask questions, either via email or in the comments. And hey! Is there a Pasadena location in the book that you want to see? Send in your requests (include the page number where it's mentioned) and I'll do my best to get you a picture of the site in the book.

How's it going? Check in!

Update: Rereading the post this morning I note a couple of things: First, the real-life officers who died in the line of duty gave their lives making Pasadena safe for the rest of us. Second, since 1886 many officers have died, but only four died in the line of duty. That's an amazing record of safety.

16 comments:

Katie said...

Ooh - another photo from The First Cut! I'm up to Chapter 16 and am really enjoying the book. I'm sure I can come up with a possible photo location. I'll get back to you on that. For everyone not reading the book -- you're missing out on a great read!

Keith said...

Working on it but need a few more hours in each day at the moment. I know me though, there will soon come a point where I won't be able to put it down.

Anonymous said...

"Memoriam" is misspelled on the top plaque.

Petrea said...

Oh dear, Anonymous. You're right.

Ahem. Well. Onward.

Let me know your photo requests, Katie. The police were so nice I may have the nerve to request permission at other places, too!

Keith I know the feeling. I'm usually a slow-ish reader because I read at night before I fall asleep. (Real smart. Who retains anything when they're nodding off?) But about 3/4 of the way through the book I was carrying it everywhere with me.

lynn said...

Ach. I missed all this competition lark and I LOVE competitions! Bah humbug and all that. Nice photo though.

Petrea said...

You haven't missed it, Lynn. It's going 'til the 27th!

pasadenapio said...

Thanks for featuring this, Petrea.

Additional monmuments and memorials in public spaces can be found here. I just noticed that I need to update it! It has been awhile since I was last on that page.

Bernie K. said...

I got the first clue. Working on this one … working …

(Reading is hard. My lips get tired.)

Dianne Emley said...

Glad you're enjoying the book, Katie and Keith!

"Memorium"! Oh my gosh... Good copy-editing, Anonymous.

You can read more about PPD Agent Richard Morris here:
http://www.odmp.org/officer/9647-police-agent-richard-frank-morris

George Montoya and Paul Seema were not with the PPD, but were DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) agents, ambushed in 1988 by drug traffickers in a Pasadena house. Their stories are here:
http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/agency/10bios.htm

Not much information on Clarence Peck who was killed in 1911, but you can see a close-up of his plaque here:
http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM35PW

altadenahiker said...

Sitting on the sidelines, still eating my peanuts, book in hand. I'd say if Anon is looking at all aspects of the case this closely, s/he must be in the running.

Petrea said...

Ann, that's a treasure trove of potential blog posts! Thank you.

Thanks for the links, Dianne. When I was over at the PPD the sergeant I spoke to told me a little about those deaths. I'm sure a police officer knows the dangers when s/he takes the job, but that doesn't make a death less tragic. Heroes all.

Right, AH. Anon would be a good contender. You, too.

Dianne Emley said...

It is remarkable that the Pasadena P.D. has so few lost in the line of duty. I know the extensive training their officers go through. Pasadena, CA is a lovely place, but there's also crime. Yes, regarding the fallen, heroes all.

Anonymous said...

This is John, Petrea's husband, just breaking in here to say "Honey, remember, you said you were going to get up early …"

Dianne, your book is lovingly crafted. There's such vivid action, the pages curl up & turn all by themselves.

Dianne Emley said...

Wow! Thank you, John, and everyone who's heaped praise on The First Cut. I'm delighted that Petrea introduced the book and me to this blog. It's been fun.

Anonymous said...

Actually Pasadena PD itself has only had one officer murdered in the line of duty (Morris), in 1969. Peck was killed by accidental gunshot, way back in antiquity.

Petrea said...

Anonymous, here's a link to the details of the Police Department Memorial pictured in this photograph. Clarence Peck, as you noted, died of an accidental gunshot wound in 1911. Richard Morris was shot while on duty in 1969. The two other officers shot in the line of duty were DEA agents working in Pasadena, but not Pasadena Officers.