Thursday, November 20, 2008

Daniel Boone's Horse

Wander south from the parking lot in Lower Arroyo Park along the east side of the wash, and you'll soon come across this equine sculpture leaning against a tree. In the couple of years I've been traipsing about the Arroyo the sculpture has evolved: a stick here, a bit of bark there. But it's the same horse I've come to know.

You may remember Dave Thomson. In the early days of this blog, Dave sent me a couple of pictures that ended up as posts: Bad Stunt Weather and It Was Something Special. Both were photos I could never have gotten because I don't have a decent telephoto lens and because Dave's a good photographer. Here's another photo from Dave I could never have gotten, this time because it was taken before I discovered the Arroyo.
Dave's words about this photo:
"I would say that was taken at least 3 years ago. Remarkable the hoss has hung in there so long."

Well, yes and no.

The only things the same on this horse, as far as I can see, are the right hind leg and a stick that goes across its left side horizontally. The rest I can't be sure about. I don't know who created the original sculpture (it reminds me of Deborah Butterfield's work), but it's a communal artwork now. The denizens of the Arroyo keep it together, one stick at a time.

I think next time I'm down there I'll relieve its belly of a stick or two. Poor thing has put on so much weight it can hardly stand up.

25 comments:

Keith said...

This is great. Gives new meaning to the term "public art".

Bernie K. (in Firefox) said...

O, the possibilities here are endless:
- Touch of Old Paint and she'lll be good as new!
- Carrot? I thought you said "stick"—!
- on the web you can stream horses in mid-switch
Etc etc …

Saretta said...

Maybe it's pregnant...

Dina said...

I love this whole idea!
Only in America . . .

Jilly said...

What a lovely story of this horse. It's so good to know that people are keeping it going and that you will reduce its weight.

Sharon said...

These are great communal art works. I enjoy seeing these driftwood and scrap wood sculptures.

pasadenaadjacent.com said...

I put the bark on the bridge of the horses nose. My contribution of a pine cone cheek fell off.

lynn said...

Great pic, Petrea and interesting info.
Marvellouth. lol.
News of the fires has pretty much stopped here in UK. What's happening?

Miss Havisham said...

Arroyo Hoss

(MG has an ear ache)

mademoiselle gramophone said...

Hope the environmental music in the cafe isn't too loud today.

I'll have a little Joe and aBonanza with cheese

USelaine said...

And I thought it was a Butterfield horse! If there was lichen around, I'd put it on for the mane.

Laurie said...

Petrea, this is so great. It reminds me of a bizarre tree back in Austin where I grew up. Over the years, people started nailing shoes to the trunk. (?????) And it ended up a local oddity covered with hundreds of random shoes. The attachment never seemed to harm the actual tree and I never figured out HOW the whole idea got started. I mean -- who would nail one shoe to a tree? And who would come along and say, hey, that is a good idea, I have a spare shoe to nail to this tree as well?

People are wonderfully strange.

I agree-- this horse needs a little editing around the belly. Give us an update when you do it, P!

Vanda said...

Oh that's awesome. It reminds me a little of the work of Andy Goldsworthy.

elizabeth said...

yep, looks like horsie has definitely been hit by the middle-aged spread. How very angeleno that he's going to have a tummy tuck!

JM said...

That's so cool! I like the horse and the title of your post too! :-)

Christie said...

It definitely gives meaning to "public art" I love it! Artwork that you can add things to that doesn't detract from the artist's intent. Lovely!

b.c. said...

i love this, i like how you can be part of the horse's maintenance

Ms M said...

That's a fun piece, and love how it truly is public art. And Bernie K has written the perfect captions...

Petrea said...

I wish I'd gotten home earlier to respond more individually today. Ah, well...a couple of notes then.

Only in America? Dina, why don't you start one? I'll bet people will contribute.

PA: I *knew* there was something of yours there. I knew. It's an artistic addition, too. Not just fat.

Fires are in much better shape now, dear Lynn. Most are out, all are contained. You are thuweet to ayathk!

MG: Did Lorne Greene give birth to William Shatner?

Laurie, it's logical: haven't you ever heard of a shoe tree?

Vanda, I think I've heard of Goldsworthy. Is he the guy who creates art out of natural materials, intending it to be temporary?

I don't know if this work was meant to be a communal piece, but it has become one. I'm almost afraid to touch it, but I think doing so will feel like a rite of passage into Pasadena's insides. I'll let you know.

USelaine said...

Ben was always my favorite Cartwright. Let's just hold on to the good memories.

Dina said...

I can't imagine such a thing lasting long around here. Maybe it would walk away as firewood.

Petrea said...

hee hee, Elaine.

Dina: are people too poor, or just not interested in art?

Dina said...

I had more in mind that some young people just like to destroy, I guess. Hope I'm wrong.

Petrea said...

Ah, I get it. That's true anywhere. That's one thing that makes this sculpture so remarkable.

Dina said...

Funny how I couldn't bring myself to say that outright the first time, until you asked more.
You are such a good questioner and answerer too, Petrea.