Thursday, September 4, 2008

City Hall Hall

Do you mind if I post another photo of City Hall? I've said it before: it's hard to take a bad picture of the place. This is the hallway that runs the length of the east side of the building. There are similar hallways along the other three sides of the courtyard, but the east side's different because it's open to the street, and to the sun.

I've posted about City Hall before. You can read those other posts by clicking the label "city hall" below. If you're in town, stop by the information booth inside the (impressive) entryway and get a brochure. Give yourself a tour. Take some photos. It's hard not to.

25 comments:

Virginia said...

Let me try and say this without gushing. I love this photo. I like the color, the perspective, the light....
I'm gushing aren't I! Well it's hard not to because it's just a lovely image.

Life Observer said...

P, no we don't mind if you show CH again.
We're patient. Just take as long as you need for the other pics.

Another nice shot.

Bernie K. said...

Odd, isn't it, how the world abhors symmetry? Almost everything we can find, scientifically or otherwise, has at least two sides, but they never match up perfectly. Earth creatures are bilateral, but subtly off. Even crystals cleave irregularly under a microscope. We have to mold our idea of perfect symmetry in things—here, stone and stucco. Yet that railing on the left brings in the note of asymmetry; were we to banish all such adornment from a building (cf. the Taj Mahal), the sun insists to rise on one side only. Creep up to these beautiful walls and you'll find, in the smooth paint, nature's patient encroach: some tiny crack, like the flaw in a Navajo rug, admitting the universe, in both senses.

altadenahiker said...

Oh, I'll bet I could take a bad shot of it without trying too hard. (Your shot belongs in The Third Man.)

Sharon said...

This is a beautiful photo of a much more traditional city hall building that the one in Phoenix. Don't get me wrong, I love our city hall, but this somehow represents what a traditional government building should look like.

USelaine said...

For you, Bernie K. Almost synchronous.

Bernie K. said...

@ Altadena Hiker: Don't be so funny. After all, it's not like you have a City Hall. Like my daddy says, in the SG Valley for 8 years under the Bushes, we had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but we produced you, Petrea, Miss Havisham and West Coast GrrrrRRRrrrlie Blather. In the rest of the Valley they had business as usual—they had more than a century of democratic ignorance and commerce, and what did that produce? The Gamble house. So long, Holly.

@ USElaiiiiiiiine: "Almost synchronous" … story of my life.

altadenahiker said...

I have to say, I have to say
As I am working on my resume,
I think I love you Bernie K.

"Anyway, I was dead broke when I got to Vienna. A close pal of mine had wired me, offering me a job doing publicity work for some kind of charity he was running. I'm a writer, name's Martins, Holly Martins. Anyway, down I came, all the way to old Vienna, happy as a lark and without a dime."

Miss Havisham said...

I call architecture frozen music.


- Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

USelaine said...

There are so many TV and film stories where the EX-girlfriend is named Elaine. Almost synchronous.

USelaine said...

And as Agent 86 used to say, "Missed it byyyyy that much."

Bernie K. said...

He was quoting Schiller: "After all, we are both idealists, and should be glad to have it said of us that we formed the world, rather than allowing it to be formed by … KAOS!"
[in correspondence, June, 1804]

marley said...

It looks like it goes on forever!

Lydia said...

Ooh, love this. What creamy colors and architectural loveliness. Probably one of the most beautiful city halls in the country, if not the most beautiful?

Christie said...

Oh, my goodness. I can't imagine any building around here with open hallways and beautiful courtyards. Everyone would freeze themselves for 7 months of the year!! And the snowplowing you'd have to do in that hallway! It is a gorgeous hallway though, Petrea. Thanks for sharing and letting us dream a little in the north!

Ms M said...

There's something very impelling in gazing down a corridor of arches, especially as distinctive as those. Our eyes want to follow it all the way down, (then some of us imagine what is beyond what we can see in the photo).
Wonderful shot!

Dina said...

Nice indeed! Are you sure it's not the cloister of a monastery?

Kahunna said...

I'm impressed. Although I'd be even more impressed if that was you in the shot and you set the 10 second timer!

Kelly said...

Wow! Great perspective, Petrea! I imagine the rest of the building is just as beautiful!

Petrea said...

Virginia, you made my day.

Thanks for the permission, L.O.

Bernie, I thought the same thing, but not so eloquently.

Okay, Altadenahiker, I admit I've taken some bad ones. I promise not to post them.

Traditional it is, Sharon. Based on the Palladian style. They were definitely going for that.

Nice one, USElaine. Thanks for the link.

Bernie, another interesting, odd point.

Arriving in Vienna without a dime sounds scary. I must be grown up.

Like a hall of mirrors, Marley.

Eye of the beholder, Lydia, but it does strike awe in some.

That made me giggle, Christie. I'm familiar with your environs. This style would never work in Petoskey!

Thanks, Ms M. Surely that's why they built it that way.

Dina. That's the word I was looking for. The courtyard is reminiscent of a cloister. It's a quiet, contemplative place, and there are no signs telling people to behave that way. The architecture makes it so.

Kahunna, next time I might try that.

Kelly, there are so many pretty angles there that I keep going back for more.

Chuck Pefley said...

Petrea, I can't blame you wanting to go back to this scene, again and again; peace, grace and beauty simply exude from this stunning (and non-typical city choice of) architecture. Cloister-like, for sure. Lovely!

Petrea said...

It's always nice to have a visit from you, Chuck. Thanks for dropping by!

Dina said...

Petrea shalom! Your comment
"Dina. That's the word I was looking for. The courtyard is reminiscent of a cloister. It's a quiet, contemplative place, and there are no signs telling people to behave that way. The architecture makes it so."
This is a deep way of articulating a feeling that *I* have long been looking for! Thank you!
So glad I've found you, a virtual fountain of soul wisdom.

babooshka said...

Oh no, you post away. This is a marvellous image. Real synergy between the building and photographer.

Petrea said...

Dina, what a compliment, thank you. I left a note on your blog about a book you might like.

Babooshka, I'm glad you like it. There are many other beautiful buildings in Pasadena, but this one's a favorite (also open to the public)!